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Years Of Struggle Worth It

SASKATCHEWAN INDIAN      APRIL 1976      v06 n24 p11  
Senator Norrie receiving her presentation from the Saskatchewan Chiefs
Senator Norrie receiving her presentation from the Saskatchewan Chiefs.
Dianne Jimmy, Rita Okanee and Wendy Dillon
Three of the Treaty # 6 princess candidates: (Left to right) Dianne Jimmy, Rita Okanee and Wendy Dillon.
Lorne Nystrom and Sol Sanderson
Lorne Nystrom [MP - Yorkton] receiving his gift from Sol Sanderson.
Gordon Angus, Victor Thunderchild and Austin Tootoosis
L-R: Gordon Angus, Victor Thunderchild and Austin Tootoosis singing the Honour Song.

After all the years of struggle and fighting for Indian Control of Indian Education, Chief Solomon Sanderson has at long last witnessed some of his dreams come true with the official opening of the Saskatchewan Indian Cultural College and the Saskatchewan Indian Community College.

As one of the four initiators of the colleges, Chief Sanderson was (as well as the other three) presented with a pipe and a headdress.

He said, "The occasion was a humble one for him and on behalf of his wife and two daughters was honoured to receive the Indian degree bestowed on him."

He went on to briefly explain the whole set-up of the colleges. He said, "The purpose of the Cultural College is to develop programs and is funded by the Department of Indian Affairs."

The concept of the Saskatchewan Indian Cultural College is to assist bands develop skill training programs which are needed. Monies for this college come from the province, Department of Indian Affairs, and Manpower.

The Federated Community College with the University of Regina is the professional development level, which works towards Indian studies program.

Chief Sanderson said, "The real impact will be felt in local communities first. Services in reserves will develop the way we want them developed."

He said, "Some groups to acknowledge are the Language Instructors, Childcare Workers, Guidance Counsellors, and Teacher Aides. These groups are the real forces in Indian Education and their first objective is to improve conditions for Indian children."

In closing, Sol said, "I will continue, along with the rest, to open doors."


Years Of Struggle Worth It

SASKATCHEWAN INDIAN      APRIL 1976      v06 n24 p12  
Chief Dave Ahenakew
First in Country Ahenakew

Chief Dave Ahenakew thanked the people for the honor bestowed upon him when he was presented with a head dress, a peace pipe and an Indian degree during the opening of the Saskatchewan Indian Cultural College and the Community College.

Chief Ahenakew began by saying that it is appropriate to start the Centennial of Treaty # 6 in his manner.

He said, "this is the first time in this country that we have a college which is truly Indian and at the same time that Indian control is linked directly with the Crown".

"This Cultural College is legally recognized. It is ours. We developed it; designed it; and we run it."

"The system of education is going to change in the future. If any changes are to be made, Indian people themselves will do them."

"The type of information and material required will be provided through the college. They will teach things which are relevant and true."

He said, "The Indian people will be able to strive forward knowing that the Cultural College is for the Indian people".

In closing, Chief Ahenakew said, "We will continue to move forward in a positive manner."

Ed Tchorzewski cutting ribbon to officially open Community College
Minister of Continuing Education Ed Tchorzewski, cutting the ribbon to officially open the Community College.
Mary Lou Fox
Mary Lou Fox from the Ojibway Cultural Foundation presented the FSI with a special message from her people. The translation reads: "Our Fellow Indian Brothers and Sisters, we pay honor and respect. may our hearts and minds be together as one." The illustration in the middle symbolizes fish which are the spirit of the Ojibway people.